HARBORNE VILLAGE WI HEART UPCYCLING!

TABLE 1 - CARDS FROM PLASTIC BOTTLES/RE-CYCLED CARDBOARD

 

  1. Fold a card blank in half along the crease line, lining up the edges carefully.
  2. Make a firm crease by passing the boner tool across the fold line a few times.
  3. Check that you are working on the front of the card and not the back (a very easy mistake to make)!
  4. Use the paper template to mark the placement of your 4 wooden hearts using a pencil through the holes in the template to make a small mark on your card front.
  5. Place a sticky foam pad on the back of each wooden heart.
  6. Peel off the backing paper and place your hearts as drawn on the template – lining up the points and the heart centres using a ruler to keep them in line.
  7. Punch a heart from a plastic bottle waste pieces using the Fiskars THICK heart punch.  Pick a colour that co-ordinates nicely with the colour of your cardboard.
  8. If you feel like it – punch a heart out of some of the re-cycled cardboard instead?
  9. Stick another foam pad in the centre of each of the wooden hearts and peel off the backing so you can stick your plastic/card hearts in place.
  10. Now punch a small heart from recycled cardboard.
  11. Put a SMALL amount of glue into a plastic holder (re-cycled contact lenses cases!).    Share the glue between you – it is expensive stuff and a little goes a very long way.  Using too much glue is the easiest way to spoil your card!
  12. Use a cocktail stick to apply a little glue over the top of the plastic/card heart to cover the foam pad area.
  13. Drop your small punched heart on top, pushing it into place with a cocktail stick so you don’t get your fingers gluey.
  14. Apply another tiny dot or two of glue to the centre of the heart and drop a heart sequin – or a co-ordinating bead into the centre to finish off your card.
  15. If you want to, stick a greeting in the centre – or inside the card.
  16. Leave it to dry for 10 minutes or so, then place your finished card inside an acetate bag with the front of the card facing towards the front of the bag and a matching envelope behind it (flap on the inside), so your card can be seen clearly on the front.
  17. Close the seal on the back and apply a hospice sticker in the centre.
Handmade Cards - Never throw away your scraps of card and paper
Handmade Cards from an Up-cycled Water Bottle
Inspiration for making your own handmade cards

TABLE 2 - FIND YOUR INNER ARTIST - HEAT EMBOSSED CARDS

Hydrangea Card - Blue Distress Ink Pad

  1. Fold a card blank in half along the crease line, lining up the edges carefully.
  2. Make a firm crease by passing the boner tool across the fold line a few times.
  3. Check that you are working on the front of the card and not the back (a very easy mistake to make)!
  4. Choose a blue square mount and attach it to the centre of your card using 4 sticky foam pads. 
  5. Place one in each corner of the back of the mount, peel off the backing paper and press firmly into place.
  6. Take a square of cream cardboard and place it – smooth side up – on the chopping board (to protect the work surface – and catch any stray embossing powder later!)
  7. Use the stamper tool to ink your hydrangea stamp. 
  8. Press the stamper tool onto the ink pad 5-6 times to load the ink, then brush the ink onto the rubber stamp.  Start at the top and work down making sure you cover all the intricate parts of the stamp with ink.  You will need to re-load your ink pad 2 – 3 times.
  9. When your stamp is inked, use the paper template to help you position your design in the centre of the cream card square.
  10. Place the lid back on the ink pad to prevent the ink from drying out.
  11. Turn your rubber stamp over and press firmly on the back to transfer the ink to the card.  DON’T MOVE THE STAMP AS YOU PRESS OR YOU WILL END UP WITH A BLURRED DESIGN!
  12. Carefully lift your stamp to reveal the pretty design on the card.  Remove the paper template.
  13. NOW – YOU NEED TO WORK QUICKLY – BEFORE THE INK HAS A CHANCE TO DRY!
  14. Sprinkle embossing powder all over the design, making sure that all the areas are covered.  Once the design is covered in embossing powder, you can relax and wait for your turn with the heat embossing tool – once the powder has stuck to the ink, there is no need to rush to finish the design.
  15. Using a folded piece of white card to catch the precious embossing powder for re-use (and to prevent it getting everywhere!), tap off the excess powder into the crease of the card and then carefully replace it into the tin/bag.  Make sure all the excess powder has all gone back into the container and close the lid tightly to avoid any spills!
  16. Now, turn on the heat tool and hold it an inch or two away from your design.  Any closer and you risk burning the card!  It will take about 15 seconds to melt the embossing powder and create the pretty raised, shiny look we are trying to achieve.  Be patient – work across all the areas of the design and watch them gradually come to 3D life.
  17. When your design is complete, stick it to the centre of your blue mount using a sticky foam pad in each corner.
  18. Finish your card by making a small blue bow (follow the instructions on the bow maker tool) and fixing it into place in the corner of the card using a sticky foam pad.
  19. Place your finished card inside an acetate bag with the front of the card facing towards the front of the bag and a matching envelope behind it (flap on the inside), so your card can be seen clearly on the front.
  20. Close the seal on the back and apply a hospice sticker in the centre.
WI Blue Hydrangea Heat Embossed Card

Rose Basket Card - Pink Distress Ink Pad

  1. Fold a card blank in half along the crease line, lining up the edges carefully.
  2. Make a firm crease by passing the boner tool across the fold line a few times.
  3. Check that you are working on the front of the card and not the back (a very easy mistake to make)!
  4. Take a cream heart shape and choose a pink border for it.
  5. Put a SMALL amount of glue into a plastic holder (re-cycled contact lenses cases!).    Share the glue between you – it is expensive stuff and a little goes a very long way.  Using too much glue is the easiest way to spoil your card!
  6. Use a cocktail stick to scrape a TINY AMOUNT of Hi-Tack glue over the back of the border.  Too much glue will mean it will seep out when you attach the border to your heart.  You are aiming just to create a very fine, tacky layer.
  7. Making sure that your cream heart is smooth side up, place your border on top and press it into place.
  8. Place your heart on the chopping board (to protect the work surface – and catch any stray embossing powder later!).  
  9. Use the stamper tool to ink your rose basket stamp.  
  10. Press the stamper tool onto the ink pad 5-6 times to load the ink, then brush the ink onto the rubber stamp.  Start at the top and work down making sure you cover all the intricate parts of the stamp with ink.  You will need to re-load your ink pad 2 – 3 times.
  11. When your stamp is inked, place the lid back on the ink pad to prevent the ink from drying out.
  12. Turn your rubber stamp over and press firmly on the back to transfer the design to the centre of the heart.  It should just fit without overlapping your border.  DON’T MOVE THE STAMP AS YOU PRESS OR YOU WILL END UP WITH A BLURRED DESIGN!
  13. Carefully lift your stamp to reveal the pretty design on the card. 
  14. NOW – YOU NEED TO WORK QUICKLY – BEFORE THE INK HAS A CHANCE TO DRY!
  15. Sprinkle embossing powder all over the design, making sure that all the areas are covered.  Once the design is covered in embossing powder, you can relax and wait for your turn with the heat embossing tool – once the powder has stuck to the ink, there is no need to rush to finish the design.
  16. Using a folded piece of white card to catch the precious embossing powder for re-use (and to prevent it getting everywhere!), tap off the excess powder into the crease of the card and then carefully replace it into the tin/bag.  Make sure all the excess powder has gone back into the container & close the lid tightly to avoid any spills!
  17. Now, turn on the heat tool and hold it an inch or two away from your design.  Any closer and you risk burning the card!  It will take about 15 seconds to melt the embossing powder and create the pretty raised, shiny look we are trying to achieve.  Be patient – work across all the areas of the design and watch them gradually come to 3D life.
  18. When your design is complete, stick it to the centre of your card using 4 sticky foam pads.  1 in the centre, 1 at the bottom and 2 on each side should be enough.
  19. Finish your card with a pink organza bow (follow the instructions on the bow maker tool) fixed into place in the centre of the top of the heart.  Use one of the very small sticky foam pads which will be invisible through the delicate organza ribbon.
  20. Place your finished card inside an acetate bag with the front of the card facing towards the front of the bag and a matching envelope behind it (flap on the inside), so your card can be seen clearly on the front.
  21. Close the seal on the back and apply a hospice sticker in the centre.
WI Pink Rose Basket Heat Embossed Card

TABLE 3 - KNITTING HATS FOR CHRISTMAS ANGELS

Christmas Tree Angel - Pom-Pom Hat Pattern

Your finished hat should measure 8cm x 3cm.

  1. 16 feet of wool (is enough to knit 1 hat.
  2. Using 2mm needles and 4 ply wool, cast on 23 stitches.
  3. Work 16 rows.
  4. DON’T CAST OFF!
  5. Leave a 15 cm tail and cut your wool from the ball.
  6. Thread a needle with the tail end and pass it through all the stitches on the needle  (5 stitches at a time is easiest) then pull them tight to gather them all up and fasten off securely with a few stitches that will be hidden by your pom-pom later.
  7. Turn your little hat inside out and use the tail thread to sew up the back seam of the hat.
  8. Fasten off any loose ends neatly inside the hat and trim them off.
  9. Turn your hat right side out – and you are all ready to finish it off by attaching a pom-pom.

To Make the Pom-Pom

    1. Take 3 x 16 inch strands of wool .  Use a mixture of colours if you like  to co-ordinate with your hat.
    2. Thread all 3 strands through a large eyed plastic needle.
    3. Take two 5mm metal washers.  Push your needle through the centre of both washers and pull the wool through until the ends line up with the edge of the washers.
    4. Hold the ends of the wool against the washers to stop them falling through – there is no need to knot them.  Winding the pom pom will hold them in place after 3-4 winds.
    5. Then, pass your needle back and forth through the hole in the middle of the washers, winding your wool all around them until you can’t get the needle through any more.  You should have used up all/almost all of your wool by now.
    6. Snip the wool all around the edge of the washers.
    7. Take a short (about 10 inches) length of wool.  Push it down between the washers and tie it tightly around the centre of the pom pom, between the washers, to hold all the cut wool securely in place.
    8. Knot securely – 3 or 4 times.
    9. Peel off the washers to reveal your finished pom pom.
    10. Trim any loose ends off to neaten up your finished pom-pom to your angel’s liking.
    11. Use the same thread to attach the pom-pom securely to the hat.
    12. Take a ribbon loop and thread the unknotted end through your large plastic needle.  Thread the loop through the centre of the front of your hat.
    13. Lastly, attach the hat to your angel’s head using a needle and thread to hand sew it in place through her string hair.  Make sure your seam is at the back of her head!

If you use any of the sparkly wool, save any leftover wool in the pot provided.  We can make good use of it on Table 8 – Fabric Fusing!

Have fun with making different hats to suit your angel’s unique personality.  There are a few options below, but there are really no rules here – so just have some fun with it!  I made 60 little hats last year and no two were the same!

Hat Option 1

  1. Row 1  – Knit (Red)
  2. Row 2 – Knit (Red)
  3. Row 3  – Knit (Red)
  4. Row 4  – Purl 1 (White) and 1 (Red)
  5. Row 5 – Knit (Red)
  6. Rows 6 – 16 – Stocking stitch (Red).

Hat Option 2

  1. Row 1  – Knit (White)
  2. Row 2 – Knit (White)
  3. Row 3  – Knit (White)
  4. Row 4  – Purl (White) 
  5. Row 5 – Knit (White)
  6. Row 6 – Purl (Red)
  7. Row 7 – Knit (Red)
  8. Rows 8 – 16 – Stocking stitch – Alternate 2 rows White, 2 rows Red.

Hat Option 3

  1. Row 1  – Knit (Sparkly)
  2. Row 2 – Knit (White)
  3. Row 3  – Knit (White)
  4. Row 4 – Purl (White) 
  5. Row 5 – Knit (White)
  6. Row 6 – Purl (White)
  7. Row 7 – Knit 2 White, 1 Sparkly to the end, Knit 2 white
  8. Row 8 – Purl  2 (White), 1 Sparkly to the end, Purl 2 white
  9. Rows 9 – 16 – Stocking stitch (White)
Christmas Tree Angel Hat 2
Christmas Tree Angel Hat Materials
Christmas Tree Angel - Hat Variations
Christmas Tree Angel

TABLE 4 - ANGEL DRESSES FROM A GARMENT

The garments you have available to make your Christmas Angel dresses from have been savaged from the rag bag at the Saint Mary’s Hospice Shop in Harborne.  If they hadn’t been salvaged, they would have gone to rag and generated a very small amount of funds for the Hospice.  With a little love and care, we can turn them into Christmas Angels which will raise substantially more funds.

Everything salvaged from the rag bag is immediately washed and pressed.  Then, it is ready for up-cycling.

  1. Cut away the elastic and all the seams (close to the stitching) to leave clean pieces of  reusable fabric.  There is a rubbish bag for the discarded bits of fabric.
  2. Now – find the straight grain of the fabric (see below).  This is of great importance if you are making a large project like a doll skirt.  For little Christmas Angels, it doesn’t matter so much – but it is worth taking this step to make the sewing and gathering a bit easier.
  3. Pin your dress template and 2 arm templates to the fabric with the straight grain running down following the arrow on the templates.
  4. Think about how you can make most use of the fabric you have available.  I try to keep any waste to an absolute minimum.
  5. Cut all around the edge of the templates to make a neat rectangle (7 inches/18cm by 3 inches/7.5cm) and 2 squares 5cm/2 inches) for arms.
  6. Press up a scant 1/4 inch hem on long top and bottom edge of skirt.
  7. Attach lace to the edge of skirt, catching in raw edge, using a small running stitch.
  8. Hem the top edge of skirt, catching in the raw edge.
  9. Press.
  10. With RIGHT SIDES TOGETHER, sew up the back seam with a 1/4 inch seam, making sure the raw edge of lace is inside the seam and not showing.
  11. Pink the raw edge to neaten it and stop it fraying.
  12. Turn right side out with the seam in the centre & press.
  13. Sleeves –  press up 1/4 inch hem on two opposite sides of each sleeve.
  14. With RIGHT SIDES TOGETHER, fold in half and hand sew the seam.
  15. Pink the raw edge to neaten it and stop it fraying.
  16. Turn right side out (a pair of forceps is useful here!) with the seam in the centre and press.
  17. Voilà – your little outfit is now all ready to be used to dress a Christmas Angel!

To find the straight grain of a fabric:

  1. Line up the selvedges and cut off any excess fabric – ideally with a rotary cutter rather than scissors as it is much more accurate.
  2. No selvedges?  No problem!  Pull out a thread and whichever way it pulls, you will have found a straight grain in your fabric.
  3. Line up your fabric to your selvedge and use a right angled ruler at 90 degrees to find the straight edge for your fabric piece.
  4. Fabric actually has two straight edges – it’s the selvedge you need to find to lay the double arrows in your pattern along.
Angel and Bonnet Straight Grain

TABLE 5 - BUTTON ANGELS

How to make a Pair of Button Angel Legs

  1. Tip out your button box and sort out 8 pairs of 10 mm buttons and 2/3 pairs of beads (depending on the size) that co-ordinate well.  Remember that the right and left legs should both be identical!
  2. Starting at the first leg placement point, thread a long double thread and knot one end.
  3. Take the thread through the bottom of the angel’s body, burying the knot inside.
  4. Pass the thread down through your chosen selection of buttons and beads, finishing with a button (so the thread stays put and holds her leg in place).
  5. Take the thread back up through the leg, through the opposite side of each button and secure the leg in place on the body when you reach the top.
  6. Close the centre seam, using an invisible ladder stitch.
  7. Now complete the other leg in the same way, to match.  
  8. When you reach the top again, take the thread right up through the top of the angel’s head and knot it 3-4 times underneath her hair to secure.

How to Add Angel Hair

Everything I create makes good use of up-cycled materials.   Angel hair offers the perfect up-cycling opportunity.

Discarded curtain tie-backs make LOTS of wavy/curly beautiful angel hair.  They can often be be found languishing in charity shops.  It’s time to rescue them and get creative!

Ordinary string, dyed with tea and frayed to add delicacy also makes good angel hair.

  1. Choose the yarn you want to use for her hair.
  2. Pin in place so that there is hair either side of the ribbon and the knot is covered.   Create a style that you like.  You can use your angel’s head as a pincushion at this stage!
  3. Bunches work well – you can tie them using cotton and sew them into place.
  4. Anchor the hair in place where you want it using tiny invisible sewing stitches.

If you want to make your own Christmas Button Angel, you can find the pattern on this link:

Christmas Tree Button Angels

TABLE 6 - KANZASHI FLOWERS

TABLE 7 - RING CAN PULL BAG

  1. Collect 310 ring can pulls.  Use exactly the same colour, size and shape.
  2. Cut off the sharp metal joining strip at the top of the ring using a pair of metal cutters.
  3. Take a length of 1.5mm rattail satin nylon cord and a medium sized (3 – 3.5mm) crochet hook. To make a whole bag, you will need around 20 metres.
  4. Make a slip knot.  If you have never made a slip knot before – or you have forgotten, the QR code below is a link to Bella Coco on You Tube.  I learned to crochet from her – I think her videos are great!  How to make a Slip Knot is 2.42 minutes into this introductory video.  

Follow the instructions on this You Tube Video to start making your sample.  You have enough for 3 rows of 6 ring can pulls.  I found that just 2 crochet stitches in each chain worked well with 1.5mm cord.  I didn’t break off my thread – I just carried on up to the next row.

If you want to carry on and finish making a little purse or a bag yourself at home, there is a second video on this link:

Tips and Tricks:

      • Make sure you have all your ring can pulls facing the same way and that you haven’t got any upside down.  The front should be all smooth!
      • The rattail nylon cord is lovely to work with – much easier than cotton/string – but you can be creative with which yarn you choose to use.
      • The great thing about crochet is it is really easy to undo if you go wrong.  Just pull out the incorrect stitches and put your hook back through the last loop to redo them.
      • The first couple of rows are the hardest to do – it does get easier after that!
Christmas Angels Workshop